Top 10 Countries of Birth in Australia, 2016

Top 10 Countries of Birth in Australia, 2016

The main Australian Census data is scheduled to be released on 27 June. We couldn’t wait that long. Here’s our prediction…

This month the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) released a teaser to last year’s Census – the ‘typical’ Australian at a national and state/territory level. That has only whet Australia’s appetite for more information. If you can’t wait until the major release in June, we’ve gotten together with sister agency, Cadreon to forecast some key population figures.

Last week, we released our forecast of the Top 10 Languages Spoken in Australia. Lots of great reactions from the community. Thanks for your feedback on social and LinkedIn.

You wanted more.

So we collaborated once more with sister agency, Cadreon to forecast the top 10 countries of birth as at the 2016 Census. Cadreon is a leading data and analytics agency with the expertise to build forecast models. IDENTITY Communications, as a leading multicultural marketing agency, brings community expertise. We’ve combined our forecasts of the top 10 languages spoken in Australia and the top 10 countries of birth in a new infographic, below.

Top 10 Countries of Birth Australia Infographic

The key takeouts?

  • While the total Australian population is forecast to increase by 11% since the 2011 Census, Mandarin speakers have increased by 77%, Filipino/Tagalog by 97%, people born in China by 90%, India born by 81%, USA by 103%
  • 70% of Australia’s population growth since the 2011 Census come from migration compared to natural growth contribution of 30%
  • The Philippines is forecast to be the fifth largest migrant country of birth
  • The maps say it all, migration from China and India are major contributors to our population growth

Top 5 languages in Australia

About our forecast model

We started with the 2011 Census and added net monthly long term arrival figures from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection for the months between the 2011 and 2016 Censuses. Monthly data provides a richer data set and also reflects seasonality. We also factored in the birth and death rates. It might sound easy, but I’ve seen Cadreon’s forecast model, lift up the hood and it’s mighty complicated!

How close we’ll get, we’ll find out as 2016 Census data is progressively released.

I’m proud to say that the forecast team is as multicultural as the data set; the model was built by clever Cadreon peeps from Italian and Greek backgrounds, the data came from our team made up of Australians from Chinese, Chinese-Indonesian and Vietnamese backgrounds. You couldn’t get more multicultural and collaborative than that!

Find out more…

Got questions? Want to know more about this model and other intelligent IDENTITY tools? Interested in communicating with Australia’s growing diverse consumers? Contact us.

Top 10 Languages in Australia, 2016

Top 10 Languages in Australia, 2016

Ahead of Tuesday’s 2016 Census stage one release, Cadreon and IDENTITY Communications have collaborated to predict Australia’s total population and the top 10 languages, other than English, spoken in the country. How close will we get to #Census2016 figures?

The industry has been hanging out for the release of the 2016 Census.  The last one was in 2011 and multicultural marketing agencies have been relying on data that is five years old.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), the 2016 Census will be released in three stages:

  • April 11: A preview of results and giving insight into what makes the ‘typical’ Australian at the national and state/territory level.
  • June 27: This comprehensive dataset will include national, state/territory and capital city data for selected key person, family and dwelling characteristics, including age, sex, religion, language and income.
  • October: Detailed Census data on employment, qualifications and population mobility (journey to work and previous address).

We know Australia’s diversity has changed dramatically between the last two Censuses. Rather than waiting, we partnered with IPG Mediabrands sister agency, Cadreon to forecast the total Australian population and the top 10 languages, other than English, spoken in Australia. Cadreon is a leading data and analytics agency with the expertise to build forecast models. IDENTITY brings multicultural community expertise.

The result is shown in the infographic below, which illustrates the changing face of Australia.

IDENTITY Top 10 languages spoken in Australia

The 2016 Forecast

RankLanguage2001200620112016
1Mandarin139286220604336410594597
2Cantonese225307244560263673383307
3Arabic209372243662287174375639
4Italian353605316894299833325985
5Vietnamese174236194854233390301460
6Greek263717252227252217262587
7Hindi4781770007111351174939
8Tagalog788789232881457160388
9Spanish9359398002117499140408
10Korean39529546247978795084

The key takeouts?

  • Over 1 million people in Australia speak Chinese, including Mandarin, Cantonese, Hakka, Wu, Min Nan and others.
  • Mandarin and Cantonese are the top 2 languages, other than English spoken in Australia.
  • Italian drops from 2nd to 4th most spoken language, Greek from 5th to 6th, reflecting the ageing population of post war European migrants and the relative decline in migration from this region.
  • Filipino/Tagalog is the fastest growing of the top 10 language groups in Australia, growing by 97%.
  • Korea comes into the top 10 for the first time

We’ve used the new forecast to update our recent infographic about the Chinese community in Australia below.

IDENTITY Chinese infographic APRIL 2017

About our forecast model

We started with the 2011 Census and added net monthly long term arrival figures from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection for the months between the 2011 and 2016 Censuses. Monthly data provides a richer data set and also reflects seasonality. We also factored in the birth and death rates. It might sound easy, but I’ve seen Cadreon’s forecast model, lift up the hood and it’s mighty complicated!

How close we’ll get, we’ll find out as 2016 Census data is progressively released.

But I’ve gotta say, we had a lot of fun and the forecast team is as multicultural as the data set; the model was built by clever Cadreon peeps from Italian and Greek backgrounds, the data came from our team made up of Australians from Chinese, Chinese-Indonesian and Vietnamese backgrounds. You couldn’t get more multicultural and collaborative than that!

Find out more…

Got questions? Want to know more about this model and other intelligent IDENTITY tools? Interested in communicating with Australia’s growing diverse consumers? Contact us.

NB: Updated forecasts with revised figures on 19 April 2017.

Sydney Water appoints Identity Communications to help it connect with multicultural audiences

Sydney Water appoints Identity Communications to help it connect with multicultural audiences

Campaign Brief, 8 March 2017

Sydney Water has appointed Identity Communications to its panel of creative, design and multicultural agencies after a competitive tender. The appointment is effective immediately.

Sydney Water is Australia’s largest water and wastewater provider, servicing almost five million people in Sydney, the Illawarra and Blue Mountains areas. Census statistics show that in Sydney one in three people speak a language other than English at home and Identity Communications’ key role will be supporting Sydney Water’s communications to its highly diverse customer base.

Identity Communications has been appointed to the multicultural agency roster, supporting the roll out of Sydney Water’s external communications program. A key focus will be to reinforce the high quality of Sydney’s water supplies delivered straight to people’s taps.

In appointing Identity Communications to its multicultural communications agency roster, Sydney Water was impressed with the agency’s digital communications and social media capabilities.

Part of the IPG Mediabrands group of businesses, Identity Communications will be working with other Mediabrands agencies to deliver a comprehensive communications program for Sydney Water. These agencies include data, technology and insights business Cadreon, socially-led marketing agency Society, as well as activations and brand experience agency Ensemble.

Says Thang Ngo, managing director, Identity Communications: “Multicultural audiences are highly digital, very mobile and have deep engagement with content that is relevant to them. This is an area where Identity works 24/7 and we are looking forward to our assignment with Sydney Water.”

Identity works with a range of government and commercial clients. In 2016 the agency’s work for Meat & Livestock Australia was recognised with two Australian Multicultural Marketing Awards for excellence in communications.

IDENTITY Communications scores TVB Award

IDENTITY Communications scores TVB Award

IDENTITY multicultural marketing agency starts 2017 in winning style

Only a few months after winning two AMMAs, IDENTITY Communications has been recognised with the Outstanding Branding Image Award 2017 by TVB Australia.

TVB says “the award is given an agency with new and innovative ideas which has lead to positive branding awareness amongst TVB Australia viewers”.

TVB is the largest Chinese and Vietnamese media platform in Australia, boasting over 160,000 daily viewers via household and commercial subscribers. Operating in Australia since 2000, it is a wholly owned subsidiary of Hong Kong’s Television Broadcast Limited, one of the largest producers of Asian dramas and content, which is widely distributed in Australia, China, Taiwan, Malaysia, Singapore and Vietnam.

TVB IDENTITY Award

“Strategic thinking and innovation are in our DNA and I’m really happy the IDENTITY team’s hard work has been recognised by the industry and our multicultural media partners” said Thang Ngo, IDENTITY managing director.

“I couldn’t have asked for a better anniversary present to mark my 12 months leading one of the top multicultural marketing agencies in Australia”.

IDENTITY Communications is a specialist multicultural marketing agency and is part of the global IPG Mediabrands network.

Infographic: The Chinese Community in Australia

Infographic: The Chinese Community in Australia

It seems like every marketer is interested in the Chinese community. That’s probably because, apart from English (naturally), Mandarin is now the most spoken language in Australia (overtaking Italian since the 2011 Census). When we combine all Chinese languages; Mandarin, Cantonese, Hakka, Teo Cheo and more, the total Chinese speaking population in Australia is around 650,000. 

And this audience spends. In addition to normal expenditure to set up a new life in Australia, this group includes a significant number of high value consumers as evidenced by house purchase, luxury labels and luxury cars etc. So it’s not surprising we’ve seen a spike in interest from existing and new clients in multicultural marketing (or as some clients still call it, ethnic marketing).

Given the last Census was in 2011, IDENTITY used migration figures from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection and forecast natural attrition rate to project the Chinese speaking population to June 2016 (it will be interesting to see how close our estimate is to the 2016 Census figure when it’s released later this year).

International Student data is sourced from the Department of Education and Training, Tourism data from Tourism Australia.

IDENTITY Communications is a strategy led, award-winning multicultural marketing agency. We are part of the global IPG Mediabrands group. If you find this information useful, please consider following us for more updates:

IDENTITY Chinese infographic APRIL 2017

NB: Infographic revised 19 April 2017.

Why we might be eating dumplings for Australia Day in the future

Why we might be eating dumplings for Australia Day in the future

This year’s Australia Day lamb ad from the folks at Meat and Livestock Australia pushed up a lot of people’s blood pressure.

Some were indignant that it tells us to eat lamb on Australia Day, without mentioning the words “Australia Day”, while others objected to the comparison between newly arrived boat people and the First Fleet settlers who killed many Aboriginal Australians.

First Australians have never welcomed Australia Day on January 26, and the vegans probably don’t like the cheeky dig. Though, I reckon it’s safe to say the Indians, Serbians and gays are ok with it.

Personally, I love it, especially the Haddaway ‘What Is Love’ backing track. But I don’t want to go there, today.

I love food as much (and probably more, judging by the scales) than the next person. The national debate sparked by the lamb floggers has got me thinking: what is Australian food? Do we have a national dish?

For those from India, there’s no shortage of distinctive food from their culture. I’m addicted to dosa at the moment.

Chinese – where do we begin? I’d begin and end with dumplings.

Japanese ramen; Yorkshire pudding comes to mind for the English; and the mere mention of Vietnamese pho and pork rolls instantly make me salivate.

Veteran food critic and author, John Newton, says Vegemite comes closest – and in incredible timing, it’s back in Australian hands after Bega bought it from the Americans.

For him it’s not “the Pavlova, whose provenance is hotly contested… not Peach Melba which, although named after an Australian, is not Australian. None of these justly celebrated desserts/cakes – with the possible exception of the lamington – came from Australian domestic kitchens. And none are associated with one place.”

Other favourites such as damper, lamb, steak and eggs, and pies aren’t uniquely Australian, he laments.

Newton says, just maybe, the Adelaide pie floater – “meat pie island in a pea soup sea” – qualifies. While people have served peas with pies, the “floater” is an original idea fresh from pie carts in Adelaide.

Food and drink are key ingredients of any celebration. So on Australia Day, what should we eat?

And this year, Lunar New Year is just two days after Australia Day. The Year of the Rooster falls on Saturday, January 28. With around one million Australians from Chinese, Vietnamese and Korean backgrounds, and the New Year falling on the weekend, the shindig will be huge.

But there’s no confusion when it comes to what food will be on the party table. If you want good luck, eat these lucky Lunar New Year dishes:

  • Spring rolls and dumplings: is all about wealth. In addition to being delicious, their shapes resemble ancient Chinese gold ingots.
  • Fish: for prosperity. As it sounds like “abundance” in Chinese, eat whole fish for wealth all year round.
  • Noodles: if you want long life, choose dishes with long strands of noodles. Cut them and you risk cutting short your life!
  • Tangerines and oranges: believed to bring wealth. In Chinese tangerine sounds like “luck”, while orange sounds like “gold”.
  • Mut (candied fruit): according to the Vietnamese, sweetness brings a sweet life and candied seeds such as lotus bring family happiness through having more children.
  • Watermelon: Vietnamese believe good luck comes to the household if a watermelon is cut during New Year. The inside is red and the darker the red, the greater the prosperity.
  • Lettuce: sounds like “growing wealth” in Chinese. That’s why lettuce is always ripped and thrown to the crowd at the conclusion of lion dances.
  • Whole chicken: including head and feet is symbolic of family reunion, togetherness and happiness. Make sure the chicken is as “whole” as possible, including head and feet.

Don’t ask me if I’ll be celebrating Australia Day or Lunar New Year this year. Why the either, or? I’ll be feasting on both.

In 2028, Lunar New Year falls on January 26. If we haven’t sorted out a national dish by then, it might be dumplings and noodles all round, mate!

Thang Ngo served as a local councillor in Fairfield for nine years (1999-2008). He is managing director of IDENTITY Communications, a multicultural marketing agency that is part of the global IPG Mediabrands network. He also publishes the noodlies food, travel and lifestyle blog.

Originally published by SBS, header image courtesy of SBS.

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